Magna Charta
Jolyne Sample
In Memory of
Jolyne Sample
1934 - 2001



These pages would not have been possible
without the help and encouragement of 
Sewell and Jolyne Sample 
who shared the results of their research.

Please visit the Sewell Genealogy Site Map for other pages in this series.


 
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To see where all this information came from, please click on Sources.

The Magna Charta

The following excerpt is taken from
Fredrick Lewis Weis:  The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215.
4th edition, Baltimore:  Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1991.

    "The Magna Charta (or Carta) is generally considered to be the cornerstone of Anglo-Saxon law, since it is the earliest agreement between sovereign and subject (i.e. the noble class) on the rights of both parties that is, what each can do, and the limitation of powers. In addition, the Great Charter set up watchdogs for both sides: twenty-five men representing the barons, which twenty-five signed for the barons and were sureties for the baronial performance, and the friends of the king, who were named in the Charter.

    "The story of the Charter and the study of its wording and provisions fills many books. The reader may perhaps find the most interesting and useful of these to be a nineteenth-century work by Richard Thomson entitled An Historical Essay on the Magna Carta of King John, published in London in 1828. At the head of each page is a shield of arms of a person who was in some way related to the Charter or the events surrounding it, and these arms are indexed in tables beginning on page xvii. The text of the Charter is given, accompanied by essays on content, but of primary interest to the users of the present volume are the extensive biographical notes on the Sureties, and on those individuals mentioned in the text of the Charter, or connected with it. This book runs over 600 pages.

    "Of the twenty-five Sureties only seventeen have identified descendants. Four had no known surviving issue; the issue of one died out in the third generation, and of another in the fourth. Nothing whatever is known of William de Hardell and his family. The twenty-fifth, Richard de Percy, left only an illegitimate son, Henry, to whom he gave the manor of Settle (Yorks). Henry is known to have had a son Alexander, but further information about this line is lacking, and since Henry surrendered his manor of Settle to his cousins, efforts to learn more by land records have been unsuccessful."

Fredrick Lewis Weis

For the text of the Magna Charta, click on
Magna Charta

courtesy of Fordham University's
Internet Mediæval Sourcebook.


Sewell forebears involved with the Magna Charta are outlined in the following table.
Click on the Armorial Bearing for further details of the lines of descent.
Click on the Coat of Arms for details.
Bigod Marshal de Clare
Bigod
Marshal
De Clare
 
Roger Bigod
m.
Ida
William Marshal
m.
Isabel de Clare
Richard de Clare
m.
Amice of Gloucester
Hugh Bigod
m.
Maud Marshal
Maud Marshal
and
Isabella Marshal
Gilbert de Clare
m.
Isabella Marshal
Isabel Bigod
m.
John Fitz Geoffrey
Isabel de Clare
m.
Robert de Brus
Avelina Fitz John
m.
Walter de Burgh
decoratative helmet
Robert de Bruce
m.
Marjorie of Carrick
Egidia de Burgh
m.
James Stewart
Robert (I) the Bruce
m.
Isobel of Mar
Walter Stewart
m.
Marjory Bruce
Robert (II) Stuart
m.
Elizabeth Mure
Marjorie Bruce
m.
Walter Stewart
 
   
Stuart
Stewart
Kings of Scotland
Stewart
Click on the Coat of Arms
for the continuation
of this line.


The following families are also connected with the Magna Charta.
Click on the Coats of Arms for details.
Fitz Walter
De Vere
Fitz Walter
Plantagenet
Warren


Saher de Quincy
Family records and traditions have long hinted at a descent from the Magna Charta Surety Saher de Quincy, and thanks to records shared through the kindness of Sewell V. Sample and John Rees we now have a connection.  Click here or on the coat of arms for details. Saher de Quincy


King John and his Advisors
King John
William Longespee
Alan of Galloway
King John
William
Longespée
Alan, 
Lord of Galloway



Robert Sewell    This page was set up by Robert Sewell in July 2006 to show the descent of the Sewell Family from persons connected with the Magna Charta.  Robert Sewell graduated from McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) in 1967 with a B.Sc. degree in chemistry.  After a year of studies at the University of Toronto's College of Education, he taught high school science in Collingwood, Ontario for a year and then taught chemistry, physics and general science in Hamilton, Ontario for twenty-nine years.  Robert Sewell retired from teaching in June 1998.
 

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